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Within a shallow depression an outline of a portal with a three-lobed arch encloses a relief of an 18th-century Hanukkiya from Damascus. On the exergue, in a curve parallel with the rim, the Hebrew inscription, "Hannukkiya from Damascus 18th Century.
The tenth of the Hanukka coins was struck as a reminder of the great past of the Jewish community of Holland, and to recall their tragic martyrdom. One of the oldest communities in Europe, the flourishing Jewry of Holland reached the peak of its culture and material prosperity in the 16th and 17th centuries. Amsterdam became the center of religious learning from the entire Sephardic dispersion. The two congregations, the Portuguese and the Ashkenazi, enjoyed complete freedom in the conduct of their daily affairs. In the 19th and 20th Centuries the number of Jews in Holland increased as a result of immigration from eastern Europe. The Zionist movement grew in strength, in the period between the two World Wars, mostly among the young people. With the conquest of Holland by Germany in May 1940 the Jewish fate was sealed. Of over 110.000 Dutch Jews who were deported to concentration camps only 5,450 survived. Another 21,674 were saved by Dutch gentiles who gave them shelter at great personal risk. It is known as the Holland or Dutch Lamp - 1975.
In a crown-shaped, pentagonal depression, a relief depicting 18th-century Hanukkia from Holland. From the Hanukkia collection of the Israel Museum in Jerusalem. On the bottom rim is the inscription in Hebrew, "18th Century Hanukkia from Holland."
The eleventh in the series of Hanukka coins depicts a Hanukka lamp from the United States, marking the Bicentennial Jubilee of American Independence. Among the Puritan settlers in the New World there was almost complete identification with the Biblical people of Israel. The coin is known as the American Lamp - 1976.
In the center the Hanukka lamp from the U.S., from the Jewish Museum collection in New York. The lamp is made of tin and could be placed in a box. It was used by the Jewish peddler who desired to observe the Hanukka Festival and "Celebrate the Miracle" even while on the road, making his rounds with his merchandiser, far from home and his fellow Jews. On the rim, the legend: "Early American Hanukka Lamp" in Hebrew and English.

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