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The first five-lirot commemorative coin was issued by the Bank of Israel to commemorate the Hanukka Festival, resuming the series that was discontinued in 1963. This coin depicts a contemporary Russian lamp of cast lead from the Feuchtwanger collection at the Israel Museum in Jerusalem. The traditional stylized lions supporting a lamp and bearing a plainly outlined crown, derive from religious motifs appearing on the 18th century Holy Arks in Poland and in the Ukraine. The Hebrew Letters, "nun, gimel, he and shin," framing the crown are the initials of the traditional motto of Hanukka, "A great Miracle occurred there." The lamp's style places it in the 18th century, but the geometrical designs say 20th century! It is known as the Russian Lamp - 1972.
A Russian Hanukka lamp viewed from the front. Below, the Hebrew inscription in three lines, "Hanukiya from Russia, 20th century."
The second five-lirnt coin issued bv the Bank of Israel to commemorate the Hanukka Festival, and the eighth in the series of Hanukka coins represents a Hanukka lamp from the Iraqi Jewish community. It originates from the 18th century and is at the Israel Museum, Jerusalem. It has been chosen as being symbolic of the spiritual strength and belief of Jews, in Arab countries, in their return to Zion and in our days of their leaving "the rivers of Babylon", from dark to light, from oppression to prosperity and from bondage to redemption in the Land of Israel. It is known as the Babylonia Lamp - 1973.
A Babylonian Hanukkiya, seen from the front. Below, the Hebrew inscription in three lines, "Hanukkiya from Babylonia. 18th century."
The ninth coin in the series and the first ten-lirot coin issued by the Bank of Israel to commemorate the Hanukka Festival features a Damascus lamp (Syria) of the 18th century. The lamp of Menorah symbolizes a reminder that the remnant of the ancient and once splendid Jewish community in Syria awaits deliverance from the bondage of today. The back wall, of pierced and engraved brass, is in the form of an elaborate portal, crowned by an arch with a wavy outline. In the center stands a seven-branched Menorah. "Let there be light! - this is the wonderful redemption that is to come." (H. Ben 'Atar 1696-1743). It is known as the Damascus Lamp - 1974.

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