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The first one-lira commemorative coin was issued by the Bank of Israel to commemorate the Hanukka Festival. This coin depicts a Hanukka Lamp from the collection of the Bezalel National Museum in Jerusalem; an Italian bronze specimen of the 17th century. This type was common in the 15th century in North. Africa and Sicily, and in the 18th century found its way as far as Poland, which proves once more how strongly the Jewish communities throughout the Diaspora were linked together by cultures ties. The coin is known as the Italian Lamp - 1962.
Inside a triangular incuse with curved sides, a Hanukka lamp is viewed from the front. Underneath, the inscription in Hebrew, "Hanukiya from Italy, 17th century."
The North African Lamp - 1963 was the sixth and last one-lira commemorative coin issued by the Bank of Israel to commemorate the Hanukka Festival. This coin depicts a Hanukka Lamp from North Africa, a copper and bronze specimen of the 18th century from a collection of the Bezalel National Museum in Jerusalem. The elaborate style shows decorative elements of various architectural schools: Romanesque arches from Southern Europe and Sicily, domes and rooftops inspired by the Moslem culture and forms reminiscent of church windows. In this specimen, we see the interplay of cultures that dominated this region for many centuries. It is known as the North African Lamp - 1963.
In the center, upon an incuse panel, the main part of a North African Hanukka lamp, the sides appearing on the two lateral raised panels. Underneath, the inscription in Hebrew, "Hanukiya from North Africa, 18th Century."
For some unknown reasons, this series of Hanukka coins was discontinued after the issuance of the North African Lamp issue. Granted, inflation had taken a tremendous toll on the issue prices of Israel coins, as well as on the economy. But these original lamp issues were all well received. No one faulted the designs. Collectors looked forward to the next Hanukka festival and another new issue of Hanukka coins. It is this writers opinion that the Bank of Israel erred in its decision to discontinue the series.

Thusly the collecting fraternity was delighted, after an absence of nine years vhen the announcement of a new Hanukka lamp would be issued for Hanukka 1972.

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